Tuesday, May 13, 2014

This week's lesson: Christ, the end of the law

It's easy enough to come up with a Utopia.

It's staying in one that's tough.

Consider the story in Genesis 2-3 -- the story Paul ponders in Romans 7. "In the beginning, everything is good. Everyone is virtuous. And nobody needs forgiveness . . .

In short, the Garden of Eden is perfect; it's a Utopia.

But then "the woman saw the fruit of the tree was good for good and pleasing to the eye, and also desirable for gaining wisdom" -- or as Paul puts it, "sin seized the opportunity afforded by the commandment, and produced every kind of coveting."

And the rest, you know . . .

For as Paul points out, the story of the Fall is now our story too. Yes, every individual, every political movement, and every religious reform begins with high hopes and shining ideals.

But every individual, every political movement, and every religious reform soon realizes it has "the desire to do what is good, but cannot carry it out. For [we] do not do the good [we] want to do, but the evil [we] do not want to do -- this [we] keep on doing."

That's why every Utopia ends up lacking one thing:

Utopians.

And that's why there's nothing Utopian about forgiveness.

No comments: